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the strategy -- youth strategy in afghanistan. he said that youth had the partnership with pakistan and we will not leave alone our partners. many afghan analyst, or some of them at least, they fear that after 18 months the situation of '90s when the soviet soviet union left, to be left alone to its neighbors. what do you think about that? >> i think if you look at what the president said at west pointe and how he and his advisers have qualified that since, mid 2011 is not the point at which 140,000 nato soldiers magically disappear from afghanistan and start coming home. it's the point at which we aspire that we will begin what i think will be a very slow, very small drawdown. here i think marc and i disagree. i don't think the politics of this in the united states are going to force this administration to draw down substantially before 2012. one thing i think is certain, we certainly will not have achieved lasting security change, if that's the case. what i do think is this, i think that by mid 2011, we will have a pretty good idea whether or not this strategy, the mcchrystal strategy, t
on afghanistan and pakistan. joining us tonight, ahmad kamal, pakistan's former ambassador to the united nations, and hassan abbas, another former pakistani government official who is now with the asia society and is a professional of international affairs at columbia university. and thanks to both of you gentlemen for joining us. before we do get to the big picture, i want to focus on the news that we have just seen, and that is all about the feasibility of some sort of negotiated settlement with the taliban. what are the chances that can happen? >> it's welcome and overdue. evolution of american foreign policy that has taken place. so far american foreign policy was an extension of the bush doctrine, which was to find a military solution in iraq and afghanistan and pakistan based on the concept of cut off the head of the snake and everything will fall into place. this doctrine which was evolved originally by israel did not succeed in palestine. did not succeed in iraq. and cannot succeed in afghanistan and pakistan. because the militants draw their strength in their objective, which is panic a
with in afghanistan and pakistan. and the terrain and the demography. and another issue of course is that we've already lost a thousand men and women in this war. we've already spent $250 billion in this war. we will probably spend another trillion dollars in in war, but we do need to find pa way to protect the american people from the scourge of terrorism. so we will ask the panel to discuss this today. and i'm going to introduce all four of our panelists first, because i think it will be fastest. there is a more extensive bio of each one of them on the flipside of your invitation an i will just touch on the high lights of these people. first is bruce riedel, who is a senior fellow for middle east policy at the brookings institution and a former c.i.a. officer, who has also served in the department of defense, and the national security council, and has been a senior adviser to three american presidents on middle eastern questions and terrorism and political transition and conflict press luges. -- resolution. at the request of president obama he chaired an interagency review to consider our
their embassies. changed and brought before court. five americans arrested in pakistan with suspicion. they are in custody. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast in the u.s. on pbs and elsewhere around the world. coming up, reaching for the sky. dubai shakes of weeks of economic turmoil to unveil the world's tallest building. and tensions between kiev and moscow. what they are doing with the ukraine electi. hello to you. security is being tightened for thousands of passengers flying to the u.s. for more than one dozen countries. the christmas day attempt by a nigerian man to bring down an airliner has had far-reaching consequences. nigeria, sudan, yemen, and pakistan now face full-bodied stands and pat downs. we have this report. -- full-body scans. >> the christmas day bomb plot has shaken this country. >> we are conducting an internal review. the president has called for a review of the entire government. based on what we know now. >> this was the scene at newark airport. someone reported a man walking the wrong way back into a secure area. thousands of passengers had to go through
to work with in afghanistan and pakistan and the train and the demography. -- and the terrain. and we have already lost 1000 men and women in this war. we have spent $250 billion dollars. we will probably spend another $1 trillion. we will ask the panel to discuss this today. i am going to introduce all four of our panelists first, because i think it will be faster. there is a more extensive biography of each one of them on the the side of your invitation. i will touch on the highlights of these people. burruce reidel, who is at the brookings institution and a former c.i.a. officer of who has also served in the department of defense and the national security council and has been a senior adviser to three american presidents on middle eastern questions and terrorism and political transition and conflict resolution. at the request of president obama, he chaired an interagency review to consider our policy towards afghanistan-pakistan this spring. . . this, bruce is an author, whose latest book is called "the search for al qaeda" which was published by brookings in 2008 and will be out in pap
but there are literally 1000 ngo's operating in pakistan and afghanistan. there was no road map. ronan is doing cross-hatched computerization and we are systematically reaching out. wat is toer huge issue in both countries. he will be able to tell us which ngo's in the u.s. work on water. next to him, ashley who has been with me now for a decade. . . boomer, who's been with me now for a decade. and has been in the current capacity a specializing on the all important issue of communications and counterpropaganda. this war is a war of information. and it is always been most extraordinary to me the that area is where the world's most -- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley
what i have said, there is still a problem with pakistan. if you take the death of benazir bhutto, who would have scored a landslide victory, you take the with the attack on the cricket team, this was a seismic event. you take the 17-year-old girl being flogged. you take the fact of 17,000 civilians have died this year, including 100 people to days ago. you take that and find that pakistani support for suicide bombing is cratering. the number has dropped to 5%, so the pakistani operations are now off going with the full support of the pakistani people. they cannot conduct a full war in their country against elements of their own population without the support of their population. the operation today is a real military operation. it has been successful. pakistan has changed. will they go after a kind of? who knows. what we are seeing in pakistan is the closest alignments between american objectives and pakistani is as close as it has been since 1979. the train has left the station, but advocates are also about doing less. or doing it leiter in various shapes and forms have to answer two
making it much easier for the guerrillas, unlike iraq, the afghan taliban have a sanctuary in pakistan. which is supposedly our allies but which only goes after the pakistani taliban and not the afghan taliban. the afghan taliban is always useful to the pakistani government to counter the indian influence in afghanistan, especially when the u.s. is likely to leave as the president signaled his intention to at least are pulling out troops by 2011. so that was i think a message to the pakistanis that perhaps the elements of the pakistani military that they should keep supporting the afghan taliban. now, an iraqi insurgency insurgency was primarily urban were as afghanistan is rural. because of the war, the civil war and the assassinations in addition, the tribal leadership is weaker in iraq -- is weaker in afghanistan than in iraq, and there's no awakening movement in afghanistan. the taliban are afghans, who for the most part don't target civilians. whereas al qaeda and iraq is led by foreigners, and purposely attacks civilians to strike ethnosectarian's for hatred. that of course alien
, pakistan and turkey. hamid kaai of afghanistan spoke after themeeting. >> those talin who are n part of al qaeda are other terrorist nworks are welcome to come bac to eir country, lay down arms, and resume life. >> as for th war and the surge of american troops, the u. coander, general stdly mcchrystal, says i an interview published toy in btain's fincial times, that the aim was to weaken e taliban so its leers would acceptsome form ttlement with afghanistan's government. asd if he would be content to see tiban leadersn a future governme in kabul, general mcchrystal that, "i think any afghans can play a role they cus on the future and not the past." the paper d that had "the remarks revealed t growg faith the u.s. military is placing in the hpe that aower sharing arrangement c end the war." the possibily floated in islamabalast week by robert gates teresting u.s. defense secrary, when he described the taliban apart of afghanisn's political faic. >>> the u.s.sn't the only western country trying t the talibainto the fold. in our lead focus tonight, our german partner deutsch welle gives us
for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> a car bombing in pakistan killed at least 88 people and wounds dozens more. iraq will start legal proceedings against employees of black water after a u.s. court cleared them from killing 17 iraqi citizens. there's growing islamic militancy in yemen. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later, russia sets a new minimum price for vodka. he hardly had a leg to stand on. a stork was given a new lease on life. ♪ >> almost 90 people have been killed at a community volleyball tournament in pakistan after a suicide car bomber blew himself up. the attack took place near lakki marwat. more than 20 buildings were destroyed. people are still trapped inside. we have this report from islamabad. >> many of these people have been enjoying a volleyball match. the games are played every day, this man says. we were watching together when a vehicle came onto the ground. a car packed with explosives group -- blow up near the spectators. dozens were killed instantly. many more were badly wounded. local television showed parts of what they thought was the vehicle
to afghanistan and pakistan next week. we will have live coverage of his comments in just over an hour at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c- span2. and then tom vilsack here at the state department here in washington. a set -- a special briefing about the agriculture system in afghanistan. >> american icons, three original documentaries from c- span now available on dvt. a unique journey through the iconic homes of the three branches of american government. see the exquisite detail of the supreme court. go beyond the velvet ropes of public tours of the white house, america's most famous home. and explore the history, art, and architecture of the capital. american icons, a three disk dvd set. it is $24.95 plus shipping and handling. it is available at c-span.org /stohr. >> several political retirement an announcement over the last couple of days. representative chris murphy of connecticut sounds as though he may challenge senator joe lieberman in 2012. of course, senator dodd announcing his decision not to run in 2010. we talked with bob cusec this morning about some of the changes ahead in politics. cusack
attack. this one in northwest pakistan. a car bomb went off at a volleyball game, leveling nearby homes and the death toll we're hearing past the 90-mark and it could get higher. so president obama said america will do whatever it takes to defeat the terrorists. cnn senior white house correspondent ed henry is with the president in hawaii. ed, pretty tough words for mr. obama yesterday. >> that's right, brooke. he has been referring to the fact it has been wildly reported that before christmas there had been some air strikes against al qaeda targets in yemen. the u.s. has not claimed responsibility for the air strikes themselves but as the president made clear there and other officials have said, they're very supportive of what the yemeni government is doing their on the ground. in terms of retaliation and potential retaliation for the attempted terror attack on christmas day, the white house does not use the word retaliation. we talked to top aides, and they insist the president is not interested in quote/unquote retaliation for the attack. instead this is just sort of the ongoing effo
, how much goes to russia, how much goes to europe, pakistan, iran, causing deadly consequences. how much money is accrued to the insurgents in afghanistan and around afghanistan. and also of course, how much goes into the pocket of organized crime world war. above all what the report does is links the dots together and we see the health situation, the crime situation and the organized insurgency's operation all together. this is very new. >> so in terms of the figures, some $400 million a year going to the taliban? >> yes. this is an estimate which has been produced some time ago which is confirmed in this report, at least regarding the amount of money which is being used by the taliban thanks to their role in the cultivation but especially in the processing in the labs and in the exports. >> i want to explore that with you. before people thought they were just getting a take, small take, off the top. but now you're saying that it is much, much more involved than that? >> well, we should compare for example the taliban period now when they are insurgents not in control of the countr
strikes in the afghan/pakistan border region. the claim was made by a senior commander connected to the afghan taliban and involved with the cia attack. >>> with all the focus on war and terrorism in afghanistan and pakistan, we want to go beyond that in tonight's signature story. it's about an effort in pakistan to create a better life for the next generation in a country that is consumed by poverty and is vulnerable, as we have seen two radical influences. it's going on in the pakistani port city of karachi and we hear about it from a reporter of nbc news who went to pakistan on a grant from the international reporting project. >> reporter: this is the southern pakistani city of karachi. a settlement of more than 700,000 people, built on top of a swamp and named for its original inhabitants, mosquitos. the waste of pakistan's most populous city lines the city streets and the future of s children is bleak. but tucked deep within the slum is a sign of hope. a school built by a charity. called the citizens' foundation. tuition is just 10 rupees, or 13 u.s. cents, a month per child
richard holbrooke, special representative for afghanistan and pakistan, on his upcoming trip to the middle east. he's introduced by proteins institution president strobe talbott. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, everybody. we are very honored, appreciative that ambassador holbrooke takes time off from his duties on the other side of town and indeed, on the other side of the world, to spend about an hour with us this afternoon talking about policy in afghanistan and pakistan. there are never boring moment in his last. there certainly haven't been in, of course, in the period he has had. [inaudible] >> there you go. that was a favor i was doing you, right? and of course, this is a particularly busy week and a particularly difficult week. ambassador holbrooke has got a number of members of his terrific interagency team with him here, and one of, very promising and productive aspects of the way he's gone about his job, the way in which he got in the interagency process and the u.s. government to work together, and i know a number of teams have lost a number of colleagues due to this suicide
their dad is gone half the year and why i've made this commitment to education and helping kids in pakistan and afghanistan. i also there's a lot of really great things happening in pakistan and afghanistan and all around the world and i wanted to share that with the american people. and we hear lite of bad news often. you can open up the paper any day or turn on the tv and it's pretty much a litany of bad news. one of the most exciting things mary we've talked about is that in 2000 there were 800,000 kids in school and today there are 8.5 million children in school including two and a half million females. the greatest increase in school in any country in modern history. there's a central banking system if you go is into the district courts you'll find more and more women are filing titles and deeds for land ownership. that's actually skyrocketing. i really think you can probably help me with this and you know, we can't plug in democracy you soo v to build democracy. i think the key to that is not only education but land ownership. it's a very key piece. like in afghanistan and pakistan. i
? that will be an interesting thing to watch. >> thank you for joining us. stay with us. india and pakistan are told they must work together to defeat al qaeda of the border. access to cheap malaria medicine, one of the world's chief drug companies promises just that. how far would you go if you suspected that your child was taking drugs? many parents might searched the ruins of their offspring, but one company is offering -- might searched the bed rooms of their offspring, but one company is offering alternatives used normally on criminals. >> today this dog is looking for drugs. his trainer has hidden them in this hotel room. this is preparation for checking teenagers hotel rooms -- bed rooms. >> parents have thought about searching the bedroom themselves. there is a breach of trust theire. pointing the drug dog around, it is non intrusive. >> but the idea divide the generations. >> seems pretty extreme, to send the dogs. i guess if it is the last thing they can try. >> breaks the trust, i suppose. >> maybe they do not understand what is involved when they start taking drugs. sometimes you have to start ste
at a remote outpost known as chapman in the province of khost, along the border with pakistan. this evening the associated press is reporting that the suicide bomber was invited on to the base by americans. according to a former senior intelligence official, the man was being courted as an informants and it was the first time he had been brought inside the camp. he was reportedly not searched. much of the cia's efforts in that region including drone attacks had been focused on the border between afghanistan and pakistan. as militants are believed to move frequently between the two countries. for more on the cia's role in afghanistan, we're joined tonight by jeff stein, a former u.s. army intelligence officer, who is now author of the blog spytalk and has been o program before. welcome back. >> thanks, martin. >> what kind of activities would the cia be engaged in in the khost province? >> one is paramilitary, in which they're doing raids and reconnaissance missions. the second is pure intelligence collection, trying to penetrate the taliban and al qaeda and pakistan military units as well.
in pakistan are critical in defeating terrorists in the region. this coming from "the associated press." senator lieberman saying the strikes tonight in a saving. senator mccain say they have not al qaeda and other islamic extremist organizations off-balance. he said the u.s. is working with afghanistan and pakistan to reduce civilian suffering. we will have more about u.s. policy in afghanistan, and the challenges the obama administration faces this afternoon. we will hear from richard holbrooke, u.s. special representative to afghanistan and pakistan on what future policy in the region might look like. he will speak at the brookings institution. that begins live at 2:30 p.m. here on c-span2. the house returns next week to begin the second session of the 111th congress. the senate returns eight days later on january 20. right now, democratic leaders of both chambers are negotiating a health care bill with the white house. >> the president will be speaking this afternoon. the white house has said a very comprehensive unclassified report will be released today on the christmas day attem
and pakistan. from the ambassador to the u.s. aid -- usaid personnel. i think americans can be confident and proud in the personnel we have on the ground to are doing such a good job. one other thing i want to comment on before i turn it over to lease that is that -- lisa is that there does seem to be a deficit of trust. both in terms of pakistani officials as well as afghanistan officials, they had a concern about whether the united states is going to finish the job. this is creating concern in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, as you know, a number of the senior taliban officials have moved across the borders from pakistan to afghanistan. we need pakistan's assistance to clear them and to achieve the objective of stopping their operation. yet pakistan, i believe, is somewhat concerned about whether the united states is going to be withdrawing in 18 months and if so, whether it is a good move on their part to engage in trying to clear the taliban with whom they do not have a current conflict. on the afghanistan -- side of the border, there is a similar issue. as our troops cle
will speak on afghanistan and pakistan. we have a several live events to talk about tomorrow morning. the senate, and security in governmental affairs committee will have a hearing on flight 253. and live coverage of representative hoyer at the national press club. and then at 11:00 a.m. eastern, the 2010 budget and economic outlook. >> a former adviser to margaret thatcher and a british historian will be on our three our conversation live from london with your phone calls on sunday, february 7 at noon eastern book tv' "in depth " on cspan 2. >> the u.s. debt reduction task force met. this is for 50 minutes. >> welcome. we were founded on the idea that people with different views and strong allegiance to different parties could still come together and tried to design solutions to address the nation's big challenges. we are not a think tank in the traditional sense. we said the things for a purpose. when we comeÑi together, people understand they will spend as much time at the kidding for any shared a solution as they would spend constructing it. it is fair to say that the product we
are running and managing all aspects of our actions in pakistan and afghanistan from thq ambassador to the usa i.d. person. i all the way down the line. it's, i think americans can be confident and proud in the personnel on the ground there doing such a good job. the one other thing i want to comment on before i turn it over to lisa, is that there does seem to be a bit of a deficit of trust. what i mean is, both in terms of pakistan officials, as well as afghanistan officials, they - they have a concern about whether the united states is going to finish job. and this is creating concern in both pakistan and in afghanistan. in pakistan, as you know, a number of the senior taliban officials have moved a cross the border from afghanistan into pakistan and we need pakistan's assistance to clear them and an achieve the objective of stopping their operations. yet, pakistan, i believe is somewhat concerned about whether the united states is going to be withdrawing and just 18 months and if so, whether that, whether it's a good move on their part to energy game in trying clear the taliban which whom t
. on this first day of the new year, a suicide boer killed dozenst a volleyball urnament in pakistan. >>uarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour night, the attackccurred in the northwest ibal region. we'll lookt the 2-front waagainst the taliban in afghanian and pakistan. >> brown: onhe economic front, it's good riddance to 2009 a some hopes and fears for 20. >> anybody who says that t rates dot have to go up is smoking something thatou probably can't do inost states. >> we're going to ha more foreclosures, 're going to have morjob losses. but i think that sloy but surely we' going to be climng out of this over the course of the year >> suarez: an enre report from ina on a state of the art eye care center that bieves in sharing costs anprofits. >> the patients are amg the rld's poorest people, rare ly -- e diseases. >> brown: plus the wkly analysis andew year's resoluons of mark shields and david brooks. that's all ahead on tonighs pbs newsho. major nding for e pbs newshour is prided by: >> what the world neednow is energy. the ener to get the economy humming again. the energy to tack chal
you have safe havens in places like the troubled regions of western pakistan, the lawless land up somalia, but also with issues like health were a pandemic and start in one corner of the world and rapidly spread to the entire world. we have a much different landscape given the nature of how interconnected the world is. in addition, we have a taxonomy of nation states of the world. some have great capacities, others are faltering, others bordering on being failed states and others being failed states. you have a full spectrum of countries that are in many ways on able to deal with some of the threats and issues. in some cases, either willfully blind or complicity in the threats. finally, there are issues of resources and demographics which i think become increasingly more important over the coming years, if not decades. there is the rushed for resources. you see this in china's attempts to acquire access to oil and other precious resources around the world. we see this in the question of water resources in the middle east. another key question in the context of the game in which ha
of the international meeting in montreal focusing on aid for haiti. after that, more about afghanistan and pakistan from national security advisor general james jones and senator carl levin, chairman of the armed services committee. >> wednesday, president obama delivers his first state of the union address to congress, laying out his vision for the future of the country and his plan to deal with issues such as unemployment, health care and the worse in iraq and afghanistan. the state of the union address. our coverage starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. you can also listen to the president's address live on your i-phone with the c-span radio and. >> president obama has announced new economic proposals. he spoke after meeting with the middle-class task force. this is 15 minutes. >> hey, folks. a year ago when president obama established the middle-class task force and asked me to chair it, and i might add, we were only in office two days when he set up this middle-class task force. as we campaigned around the country, he made it clear that we were going to be sure as we grew this economy, the mi
in pakistan over the past year are up almost 50%. beat pakistan is to do for peace studies puts the number of violent deaths to 12,600. there is widespread concern over terrorism, especially what may be brewing in the port center of karachi. >> the new year has already been a miserable time for scores of people in pakistan's biggest city. she lost her brother and three other relatives in a bombing in the center of karachi. >> i of children. they have been ordered to leave, leave pakistan. >> her family members were killed in an attack on a religious procession. she was recording the event on her mobile phone when the blast happened. 43 people were killed. soon after, arsonists set fire to one of karachi's biggest centers of commerce. hundreds of traders lost businesses. politicians fear the terrorist plans to target corrupting much more in the future. for leaders in karachi, they have been worried about the increasing talibanization, particularly in the poor and neglected districts. authorities say the taliban are hiding in this very area. well operations are going on in the northwest of t
that kied seveneogents in eastn afghistan may have been retaliation for american dro strikes in the afghan-pakistan border region. thelaim was made by a senior commander connecd to the afghan taliban and involved with the cia attack. >>> with a the focus on wa and terrorism in afghanistan and pakistan, want to go beyond that i toght's signature story. it's about an effort in pakistan to create a bter lfe for the next gneration in aountry thats consume by perty and is vulnerable,s we have seen two radicainfluences. it igoing on in the port city of karachi and we hear about it from a rporter who wnt on th ternational repoing project. >>eporter: in the southern pakistancity of karachi asettlement of more tha 700,000 people, built on topf swamp and named for its igin has been attendants. it means mosquo. the wae lines the cty streets and the fure of its children is bleak. but tucked deep within the slum is a sign of hope. school built by a charity. tuition is just 13 u.s. cents a month perchild. most students we born a raised in e settlent and most work outside scol hours. no childs turned away becaus
in vegas. more than 600 people have been killed in militant attacks across pakistan and the past few months alone. as part of our regular look at how events in a country are affecting individuals, our correspondent has been speaking to one of the men on the front line of pakistan's struggle to defend its people. >> of the hureds of people who -- hundreds of people have been killed and pakistan and attacks, is estimated at around 10% of the victims have been police officers. sometimes there have been killed when the buildings that have been protected and have been attacked. on occasion, they have been direct targets themselves. sometimes police officers have been killed when they stopped bombers at checkpoints like this one appeared -- like this one. >> my name is -- i am in chae of this check post. many people use this route. if someone crosses and i have not checked in, it is my fault. a big responsibility. >> there are a lot of drivers to get aggressive. they don't like waiting, but we keep our cool. we have been trained to spot the type of person who would be carrying explosives and the
have more problem there is. of course bleeding into pakistan. can we really win there? are we being truthful to ourselves? >> we have to. that's what the president's advisers are saying. we have to win there. here's how we can win. that's why it is so important for the president to listen to mcchrystal to listen to those who are there on the frontlines. they are on the ground telling him what it is we need with this new strategy. >> what does governor palin really think about secretary of state clinton? her answer might catch you off guard. governor palin says president obama has a pre9/11 mentality. what does that mean? find out next. you are going on governor palin's book tour bus as it roars down the highway. roars down the highway. that and more, m m m m ahhh. tt the latte budget under control. mm-hmm. [ female announcer ] trying to be smart with the family budget? here goes the good old steam. [ pfffft! ] whooa!!!! [ female announcer ] let bounty help... because it cleans the mess with less than the bargain brands. it's thick and absorbent. and really durable. in lab tests bou
's increasingly operating in ungoverned areas like the after/pakistan border and the algerian border and so on-- they're being forced to concentrate on areas, including yemen, to recruit people, train people and so on and they will continue to make every effort they can. but i'm not sure that we should immediately panic, that the events of christmas day means that they're very much stronger than we thought they were. i think they're actually still quite weak and pretty much on the back foot. >> rose: eric, have we learned anything new bause of this? >> i think what it's shown, as richard was saying, is that you have the ability of an affiliate not just al qaeda in pakistan, to put together a relatively sophisticated plot, albeit with somebody who didn't quite get his explosives right. in this case you did have a young man from nigeria who was able to trained and equipped in the use of explosives, put on an airliner. he's the kind of guy al qaeda is looking for. somebody who speaks english well he's traveled in the west, he has most importantly visas that will get him into the united states and
. it is certainly a rock where -- i was just on a trip to iraq and ask -- pakistan before the holidays. in iraq, i was moved by the fact that most of the people i discussed issues with wanted to talk about economics. they want to talk about development. clearly, we are on a path right now where we will start to withdraw significant numbers of troops after the elections on march 7. by the end of 2011, the plan is that all american troops are out of iraq. we have worked hard to put those plans together and we are on track. that does not mean that there are not challenges or it will be easy. there are huge political challenges there. we understand that. i have been taken by the fact in recent months that in these very tragic bombings when some many lives were lost in iraq, there is not a sectarian response pri. the government their adjusted and is learning to deal with these kind of things and that was reinforced by my most recent visit. by no means, do i want to send a message that we're taking our eye off iraq. that is not the case. we still have talent is there. al qaeda is still there it very spe
local newscast at 7. don't forget wusa9.com is always on. ht ho terror attack in pakistan. a suicide bomber strikes a volleyball tournament killing more than 70 people. i'm jeff glor. also tonight, the search for answers in the christmas jetliner attack. as president obama reviews the security failures, new questions emerge about his choice to run the agency overseeing airline security. no smoking, no texting, no transfats-- some new laws for a new year. plus backbreaking work for a neighbor they'd never met >> you should do for your neighbor as you would like them to do for you. >> glor: in tonight's "american spirit." captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> glor: good evening. katie's off tonight. pakistan has long been known as one of the world's most dangerous places. what happened today brought the situation to a new and frightening level. a suicide bomber blew up his vehicle in a field during a volleyball tournament in northwest pakistan. at least 75 people were killed, more than 60 others hurt. no one has claimed responsibility but eliz
success al qaeda's leadership was able to find a safe haven in pakistan's tribal areas. a few years later it gained enough strength to once again pose a serious threat to the u.s. meanwhile the taliban reestablished its headquarters in pakistan and gained enough strength as a result of inadequate afghanistan security forces. by last year the situation had grown so pa perilous that generl stanley mcchrystal issued a report stating that our failure to gain the initiative and reverse the momentum of the taliban within 12 months to make defeating the insurgency impossible. it was largely as a result of that assessment that the president agreed last year to send 30,000 more troops to afganistan. earlier this month i and some of my colleagues had the opportunity to visit afganistan and pakistan to assess the situation on the ground firsthand. among other things, we saw progress in the crucial southern provinces of kandahar. though in the early phases general crystal's -- mcchrystal's plan to hold the taliban and build afganistan security forces and build a government for future stability show e
, and of course our intrepid special representative for afghanistan and pakistan. we have travel plans for these gentlemen in terms of heading to the region in the very near future, but we thought it was a good time to talk a little bit about where we are in the civilian component of the strategy that the president has announced last month, and in particular the centrality or the corp. aspect of helping to rebuild the agricultural sector of the afghan economy. so we will start this with secretary vilsack who represents really the whole of government approach to our strategy as the secretary and the president have emphasized and then raj shah will come in and talk a little bit about the eight component and then richard, i know we are trying to squeeze in this briefing before the president speaks but we will this kind of put this in the broader perspective of our strategy. gentleman, thank you for coming. >> i appreciate the opportunity to be here with sam besser holbert i think is fair to say agriculture is the top nonsecurity priority for the united states government in afghanistan and
.s. air strikes in pakistan and afghanistan. >> iraq is yesterday's war. if we do not act preemptively, yemen will be tomorrow's war. >> these are people who were held in gitmo their return and have now gone back to the battlefield. >> president obama's top tier adviser says -- joining us is the white house reporter for "politico." in the wake of this attempted terror attack on that flight from amsterdam to the troy, -- to detroit. >> president obama is really looking at this issue with two different reviews. he has ordered that basically all the intelligence agencies appear in the situation room on this coming tuesday. he is coming back from hawaii, and there will be a meeting asking what they did, what went wrong, and what should be done better the next time. the lot of folks are talking about folks who will lose their jobs. >> there have already been some changes in airport security. >> there is a major change, you might call it was i-profiling. -- quasi-profiling. passengers from the 14 countries coming in on international flights will be subjected to some heightened level of secur
rundown" interview with ambassador richard holbrooke. he's now the special u.s. envoy for pakistan and afghanistan, just back from the region. can the u.s. really work with the taliban? that's one of the questions we'll ask. >>> but first, the white house soup of the day on this monday, it's lentil. you're watching theda"the daily rundown" on msnbc. ♪ who knew thd go and check my credit score ♪ ♪ now all they let me have is this dinosaur ♪ ♪ hello hello hello can anybody hear me? ♪ ♪ i know i know i know i shoulda gone to ♪ ♪ free credit report dot com! ♪ that's where i shoulda gone! coulda got my knowledge on! ♪ ♪ vo: free credit score and report with enrollment in triple advantage. hey bets, can i borrow a quarter? sure, still not dry? i'm trying to shrink them. i lost weight and now some clothes are too big. how did you do it? simple stuff. eating right and i switched to whole grain. whole grain... [ female announcer ] people who eat more whole grain tend to have a healthier body weight. multigrain cheerios has five whole grains and 110 calories per servi
, was turned to become a cooperating double agent, was sent into pakistan and began feeding the jordanians and the c.i.a. very tantalizing material. i'm told that he sent a detailed assessment sdz of our predator missile attacks on al qaeda operatives in the tribalreas in pakistan. he sent photographs of himself with high-level al qaeda operatives thereby establishing his bona fides as a very effective double agent. so on the day that he came to this c.i.a.s may be in khost in eastern afghanistan, there was a large group of americans and one jordanian waiting for him with greatest excitement because it was hoped that this jordanian double agent could take them, could give them information that would allow the targeting of ayman al-zawahiri, the number two official in al qaeda. he arrives in a car, the car is taken to a place the agency says where he was going to be patted down. as he's getting out of the car with three c.i.a. security officers near him, he reaches into his jacket, the c.i.a. officers tell them to stop that and at that point the bomb detonates. the bomb was so powerful, so
ambassador to iraq and pakistan and now the university dean of the bush school at texas a&m joining us from there this morning. thank you sir we appreciate your time. >> guest: happy to be here. lescallet mr. with a front page of "the washington post" and get your reaction coming u.s. playing a key role in yemen providing data and weapons to the yemen government there in hopes to kill al qaeda leaders and other officials in that country. what you think of this effort? >> guest: again i have no knowledge of the specific things we are doing now with yemen but i think this is consistent with what i would consider it prudent policy. we are in support of the yemeni government. we can't do this directly. we can't leave it. we have to assist them if this is going to succeed and it sounds to me like that is exactly what we are doing. >> host: help our viewers understand why yemen? what is happening in this country? what is happened leading up to the situation in this country? >> guest: yemen is a country that has faced a huge challenge, not just in the last few years ago for decades. there was not
correspondenthere. the mber killed by militant attacks in pakistan over the past year are aost 50%. beat pakistan is to do for peace studies puts the numr of violent deas to2,600. there widespread concern over trorism, especially whatay be brewing in the port center of karachi. >> the new yearas already been a miserable time for scores of people in pakistan's biggt city. she st her brother and three other relatives in a bombing in theenter of karachi. >> of children. they have beenrdered to leave, leave pakistan >> her fily members were killed in an atack on a relious procession. she was recording the event on herobile phonehen the blast haened. 43 peoe were kied so after, aonists set fire to one of karachi's bigst ceers of commerce. hundreds of traders lost businesses politician fe the terrorist plans to taet corrupting much more in thfuture. for leaders in karachi, they have been worried abouthe increang talibanizatn particularlyn the poor and neglected districts. auorities say the taliban are hiding in this very area. wl operations ar going onn the northwest of the country, in places like thi
-- the christmas day attempt. countries including at the sudan and yemen and pakistan now face fall by the scans and pat downs. >> president obama has returned from holiday to face a wave of issues. >> we are conducting an internal review. the president has called for a whlole of government review, based on what we know now. >> this is the scene at one of the busiest airports. there was one man who went into a secure area. thousands of passengers had to go through security all over again. flights were grounded. the man was not fast. >> so we can all go back through. as you can see, it is an absolute chaos. >> be more security, as far as i am concerned, the better -- the more security. >> they patted me down, and they literally did it a full body, -- did a full body, legs and everything. i had just not seen that before. >> iran, syria, sudan, and cuba. kenmore, including afghanistan, nigeria, pakistan, and yemen. and more. if you are from one of those places, you will face more intense screening. and the crew may not let you see the flight map. they may ask you to stay in your seat for one hour b
to afghanistan and pakistan, and later, the town hall meeting hosted by the representative of indiana. tomorrow morning, two house members on counter intelligence and the attempted bombing of the flight. pete hoekstra is the ranking member. and then questions about jobs. good "washington journal" is live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. a couple of events to tell you about tomorrow morning. the first public meeting of the financial inquiry commission is on c-span 2 at 9:00 eastern. they look of the causes of the financial situation, including testimony from the heads of bankamerica, j.p. morgan shares, and goldman sacks. the house armed services committee focuses on military. witnesses include representatives from the department of state and the head of the u.s. pacific command. that is live on c-span 3 at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> did you know the number one freak news application for your iphone is c-span radio? -- #one free news application for your iphone is c-span radio? there's also a tab with links to all our podcast, including question -- "q &a." >> the decision to open a plan for
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